(EPUB) Õ Cries in the Drizzle Ø eBook or E-pub free

It s rare that I don t finish a book even when I m not enjoying a book, I still aim to finish it, I just don t like to leave something unfinished in any facet of my life but such is the case with Cries in the Drizzle I picked it to read for the Around the World in 12 Books Challenge in October for a few reasons, but none of them are particularly important I simply wanted to read it for the same reason I want to read anything to learn , to experience someone else s life, to open up my It s rare that I don t finish a book even when I m not enjoying a book, I still aim to finish it, I just don t like to leave something unfinished in any facet of my life but such is the case with Cries in the Drizzle I picked it to read for the Around the World in 12 Books Challenge in October for a few reasons, but none of them are particularly important I simply wanted to read it for the same reason I want to read anything to learn , to experience someone else s life, to open up my own for a new voice, a different perspective, and the hope to be inspired or touched in some way.Sadly, Yu Hua s fictionalised autobiography became a real slog to read, and at 186 pages out of 304 , I decided to stop trying to read it One thing was blazingly clear it wasn t going to improve in the last hundred pages, not for me Not finishing a book always leaves me with a bad taste in my mouth, but October was a month of reading struggle in general and a book like this was proving to be a real block to recapturing my stride and making progress on other titles But because this was for a challenge, I wanted to share my thoughts on what I did read, and why it didn t work for me.Essentially it boils down to the writing as the primary problem secondly, the story itself The first is the most subjective, and plenty of readers will love the writing style and connect with it in ways that were simply impossible for me Set in rural China in the 1960s, Cries in the Drizzle tells the story of an impoverished family through the eyes of its narrator, Sun Guanglin Guanglin is the middle child of three boys, Sun Guangping and Sun Guangming His father, Sun Kwangstai, is a horrible man, with a mean temper, a drinking habit and a seemingly complete inability to love others or care for anyone but himself His mother is a bit of a nonentity, and his grandfather, Sun Youyuan, who lives with them, is self abasing towards Sun Kwangstai, a bit of a coward and a doddery old man who sits in the corner daydreaming about his dead wife, who was once the daughter of a rich man.Sun Guanglin was sold to a military officer when he was six, but returns to his home village of Southgate when he s twelve compared to his real family and life in Southgate, life with Wang Liqiang and his wife was wonderful It isn t until Part 4 that the narrator speaks with any depth about this time in his life, and I didn t read that far Divided into sections that deal with chunks or themes in his childhood and adolescence, Sun Guanglin tells stories about his brothers, his parents, the widow his father had a lengthy affair with, his friendships with Su Yu and Su Hang at school, troubles with girls and going through puberty, and the history of his grandfather and great grandfather, who were stone masons and bridge builders before war, famine and poverty struck.I tend to be a fairly organised person, and Sun Guanglin s story has no real structure to it, making it hard for me to follow Even in the midst of a story, he seemed to change direction completely from one paragraph to the next, and gave no indication that this was a relevant tangent to the story he s telling and it ll all come together just wait It reminded me of my struggle reading John Elder Robison s memoir,Look Me in the Eye My Life With Asperger sThe scattered, unfocused style is much the same, and Hua s storytelling style tends to come across as a bit flimsy, weakly put together, and poorly fleshed out It is no doubt his style, and some readers will enjoy it, but it s not for me My brain and Hua s brain just aren t compatible we think differently, in terms of rhythm and rhyme, like we re two different musical instruments each playing a different song.There is humour here, and plenty of farce especially in the stories Guanglin tells of his ancestors it s comical but not funny The one thing that does come across strongly is the atmosphere of utter poverty, and the disconnect between the state and the working classes One of the saddest stories is about the little boy called Lulu, whose mother is arrested and sent to a labour camp for prostitution Lulu is left behind to fend for himself A boy of six There is no other family, no one to care for him or feed him, and while his mother wasn t in the slightest bit nurturing or loving, she at least provided a home for him I loved her response to the interrogation at the Public Security Bureau The clothes you wear, they re issued by the state, and your paychecks too So long as you re taking care of state business, you re doing your jobs all right But my vagina belongs to me it s not government issue Who I sleep with is my affair, and I can look after my own vagina perfectly well, thank you very much pp.134 5 There are quite a few mini stories or scenes that touch of the people s alienation from their own bodies, and complete lack of understanding or education around their bodies, their sexuality, anything practical or emotional and psychological of that nature It s quite sad, and combined with the images of poverty and the sense of these people as being quite disposable and without real value, Cries in the Drizzle paints a pretty bleak picture of communist China It does maintain its focus on the people, not the politics you simply glean truisms from the stories of people s lives I just wish those stories had been easier to follow the narration is disjointed, and Sun Guanglin s habit of omniscience robs the stories he tells of authenticity How does he know what happened, what someone was thinking, what Su Yu was feeling as he lay dying He wasn t there It s all conjecture, speculation, and this undermines the credibility of his story especially as it reads like a memoir.With no plot, there is little direction to this coming of age story There s no forward momentum or impetus When you have a plotless novel, it s down to the characters to carry the story In some ways, this being a story about people, the characters are well fleshed out And yet they always remain caricatures of themselves There s no real depth or understanding to them Sun Guanglin s narration remains consistent in this regard how he talks about people is the same as how he talks about events from a distance, both all knowing and superficial It s perplexing, and frustrating Annoying, even Even when people die, when children die something that, these days, never fails to bring on the waterworks I was left largely untouched Cries in the Drizzle failed to connect with me emotionally, and without that connection on top of a lack of plot and basic structure I had no reason to keep reading Time to move on . . .. . . . (EPUB) ⚹ Cries in the Drizzle ä Yu Hua s beautiful, heartbreaking novel Cries in the Drizzle follows a young Chinese boy throughout his childhood and adolescence during the reign of Chairman Mao The middle son of three, Sun Guanglin is constantly neglected ignored by his parents and his younger and older brother Sent away at age six to live with another family, he returns to his parents house six years later on the same night that their home burns to the ground, making him even a black sheep Yet Sun Guanglin s status as an outcast, both at home and in his village, places him in a unique position to observe the changing nature of Chinese society, as social dynamics and his very own family are changed forever under Communist rule With its moving, thoughtful prose, Cries in the Drizzle is a stunning addition to the wide ranging work of one of China s most distinguished contemporary writers